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Is the hammock up? Could you roll out a nice lounge chair, lollygag on a porch swing, or spread out a nice big comforter on the grass this afternoon and flop down for a while?

Because on Mother’s Day, it seems that all moms ought to have a few moments’ rest.

I wish for you a glass of lemonade or iced tea and many uninterrupted moments in your favorite spot.

Today, of all days, may you find a few moments of slow.

feetup

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Our culture affects us in so many ways, urging us to stay in a high-speed, frenzied mode.

But as we move toward a “not so fast” life, we start making changes. We may manage to simplify the logistics of our daily schedule, slow down our kids’ summer plans, and sit down to enjoy more leisurely meals at the table, chewing each bite thoroughly instead of gulping it down.

And yet … even though our bodies and schedules start to slow, our minds may be stuck in that frenzied state.

Jane Anne at Gravity of Motion wrote a post about decluttering her mind. She has resolved to be present in her thoughts; to focus on one thing at a time. She wrote:

I am convinced that having an overactive, burdened mind interfers with my relationships, my productivity, my common sense, and my happiness. It enables overreactions and poor decisions.

I am paying attention to my thoughts. When I recognize a distraction, I refocus my attention. I am training my mind.

This was put on my heart this week when I realized that even when I am not constantly on the go, my mind can be swirling with out-of-control activity.

I encourage you to take captive every thought (2 Corinthians 10:5). [emphasis mine]

Our high-speed world does more than accelerate schedules and the pace at which we hustle our families out the door and down the freeway. It also distracts our minds, tempting us to multi-task and always look ahead to the next thing, missing the very moment God has given us in the here and now.

It’s a counter-cultural move, but Jane Anne is resolving to be present in her thoughts; to take captive every thought.

What’s the speed of thought?

Think about it.